Tag Archives: hellcat

Some set pictures from The Defenders have hit the Twitterverse!  The first set of pics shows Misty Knight and Jessica Jones meeting on the street.  Perhaps for the first time?  Jessica looks in pretty rough shape (more than usual?) with blood splattered on her face and clothes.  Misty has an incredulous look on her face so i’m guess this is their first meeting or maybe Misty has figured out that Jessica is a metahuman.  What do you think?

Also from the twitterverse….

The official twitter for the Defenders has been dropping title cards for returning cast members from previous Marvel/Netflix shows and it looks like Patsy, Stick, and Claire are all set to return.

 

 

Returning with them are Jeri Hogarth, Foggy Nelson, Karen Page and Malcolm from Daredevil and Jessica Jones respectively.  When will Luke Cage, Danny Rand and Colleen Wing show up?

 

Marvel’s The Defenders, or simply The Defenders, is an upcoming American web television miniseries developed for Netflix by Douglas Petrie and Marco Ramirez, based on the Marvel Comics superhero team of the same name. It is set in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), sharing continuity with the films of the franchise and is the culmination of a series of interconnected shows from Marvel and Netflix. The miniseries is produced by Marvel Television in association with ABC Studios, with Petrie and Ramirez serving as showrunners.

The limited series stars Charlie Cox as Matt Murdock / Daredevil, Krysten Ritter as Jessica Jones, Mike Colter as Luke Cage, and Finn Jones as Danny Rand / Iron Fist, all reprising their roles from their individual series. Development of the miniseries began in late 2013, with Cox the first actor cast in May 2014, and Jones the final of the title four cast in February 2016. Petrie and Ramirez joined as showrunners in April, after serving in the same role on the second season of Daredevil, and filming began in New York City that October.

The Defenders will consist of eight episodes, and is scheduled to be released in 2017.

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Jessica Jones review

REVIEW Jessica Jones S1E2: AKA Crush Syndrome

Jessica is still on the hunt for man that kidnapped NYU student Hope Shlottman.  Hope is now in prison for [redacted].  

We get a bit more screen time with Luke Cage and Trish this episode.

In episode 1, Jessica rolls out of bed after a bout of rough sex and has an awkward moment in his bathroom.   She sees a photo of a woman she recognizes in his medicine cabinet and proceeds to shamble out of his apartment muttering an “I’m sorry” before starting her walk of shame back to her apartment, stopping briefly to puke in a below ground stairwell.

Keeping it classy.

That’s part of the show’s charm though.

In this episode Jessica returns to Luke’s bar after sitting in a police interrogation room being questioned as witness to Hope’s violent crime.The police searched the contents of her bag and photos on her camera and presumably saw all the creep shots of Luke she has been taking.  Understandably, he’s not too thrilled when the police show up at his job and show him all her pictures. He is even less thrilled when she apologizes for taking the pictures and explains that his big booty cutie is in fact, married. And he is probably even less, less thrilled (can somebody even be less than less thrilled?) that she ran out out on him the night before and here she is the next morning with a bag full of trouble.

At one point in the series, Luke remarks that Jessica is a, “hard drinking, mess of a woman…” and he couldn’t be more right.  However, yet again, it’s part of her charm and we can’t help but eat it up.

Trish isn’t really given much to do in this episode except to be in scenes when Jessica is spouting exposition.  The overall plan so far is to expose Kilgrave, prove that Hope is innocent and get that poor girl out of jail.  Both women know how dangerous Kilgrave is, so Trish invites Jessica to stay at her apartment that is complete with a workout room, high tech security system, a front door to which not even the front desk has a key, a personal Krav Maga instructor and panic room.

No dice Patsy, Ms. Jones is gonna do this on her own.

Aided by some flashbacks, we find out on the fateful night that Jessica broke free of the Purple Man’s influence, Kilgrave was actually hit by a city bus.  Those memories help with her detective work as she finds out that Kilgrave suffered Crush Syndrome and used his power to make some poor guy carve out his own kidneys to perform a transplant.

Uh.. whoa.

Finally we get to see Mr. Cage in action.  Sparing the details, because it’s a pretty good scene, we definitely see his powers at work here in a bar fight.

What’s even more awesome is that this is NOT an origin story!  Nope, they are giving us what we want.  Like Daredevil on Netflix, Luke and Jess already have their powers and the show is not going out of its way to talk about how or show how they got them.

In the final scene, we see Luke show off his impenetrable skin  to Jessica by turning on a circular saw and putting the spinning blade right on his stomach and saying ” You can’t fix me, I’m unbreakable.”

 

See my other Jessica Jones Review here:

REVIEW Jessica Jones S1E1: AKA Ladies Night

REVIEW Jessica Jones S1E3: AKA It’s Called Whiskey

REVIEW Jessica Jones S1E4: AKA 99 Friends

Luke Cage, Hero For Hire (1972-1973) #15

16 Smashing Luke Cage, Hero for Hire Covers!

hellcat

Jessica Jones (Marvel/Netflix) – Who is Patricia “Patsy” Walker?  

Created by Ruth Atkinson, Patsy Walker first appeared in Miss America Magazine #2 (cover-dated Nov. 1944), published by Marvel precursor Timely Comics. Redheaded Patsy Walker, her parents Stanley and Betty, her boyfriend Robert “Buzz” Baxter, and her raven-haired friendly rival Hedy Wolfe appeared from the 1940s through 1967 in issues of Miss America, Teen Comics, Girls’ Life, and the namesake teen-humor series Patsy Walker and its spin-offs: Patsy and Hedy, Patsy and Her Pals, and the single-issue A Date with Patsy.

Attesting to its quiet popularity, Patsy Walker (along with Millie the Model and Kid Colt, Outlaw) was among the very few titles published continuously by Marvel from the 1940s Golden Age of Comic Books, through Marvel’s 1950s iteration as Atlas Comics, and into the 1960s Silver Age of Comic Books.
Following Patsy’s high-school graduation, in issue #116 (Aug. 1964), the title switched from humor to become a young career-gal romantic adventure. Patsy Walker lasted through issue #124 (Dec. 1965), with Patsy and Hedy outlasting it to its own #110 (Feb. 1967).

Patsy and Hedy made a cameo appearance in Fantastic Four Annual #3 (1965), establishing them in the Marvel Universe.

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She-Hulk

12 Sensationally Stunning She-Hulk Covers

She-Hulk was created by Stan Lee and John Buscema. She first appeared in Savage She-Hulk #1 (February 1980). A cousin to Dr. Bruce Banner, Walters once received an emergency blood transfusion from him when she was wounded, which led to her acquiring a milder version of his Hulk condition. As such, Walters becomes a large powerful green-hued version of herself while still largely retaining her personality; in particular she retains her intelligence and emotional control, though like Hulk, she still becomes stronger if enraged. In later issues, her transformation is permanent.

She-Hulk has been a member of the Avengers, the Fantastic Four, Heroes for Hire, the Defenders, Fantastic Force, and S.H.I.E.L.D. A highly skilled lawyer, she has served as legal counsel to various superheroes on numerous occasions.

She-Hulk was created by Stan Lee, who wrote only the first issue, and was the last character he created for Marvel Comics before his return to comics with Ravage 2099 in 1992. The reason behind the character’s creation had to do with the success of The Incredible Hulk (1977–82) and The Bionic Woman TV series. Marvel was afraid that the show’s executives might suddenly introduce a female version of the Hulk, as had been done with The Six Million Dollar Man, so Marvel decided to publish their own version of such a character to make sure that if a similar one showed up in the TV series, Marvel would own the rights.

All but the first issue of The Savage She-Hulk were written by David Anthony Kraft and penciled by Mike Vosburg, and most issues were inked by Frank Springer. Vosburg later remarked, “The oddest thing about that book was that Frank drew really beautiful women, I drew really beautiful women, and yet, the She-Hulk was never overly attractive.” The Savage She-Hulk series lasted until 1982 where it ended with #25 (March 1982). She-Hulk then made guest appearances in other characters’ books. Her earliest guest-starring adventures followed no specific story line, besides her recurring bad luck with automobiles. She-Hulk also appeared in the limited series, Marvel Super Hero Contest of Champions (June to August 1982), in which numerous superheroes are kidnapped from Earth to fight in space.

She-Hulk becomes a member of the Avengers in Avengers #221 (July 1982). Her early Avengers appearances continued the running gag about her car troubles. She-Hulk also made occasional guest appearances in The Incredible Hulk. Her appearance in Avengers #233 (July 1983) was drawn by John Byrne, who would later become strongly associated with the character.